by Ben Dickson
— 1 hour ago
in Syndication If a picture’s worth a thousand words, then a video’s worth a thousand pictures. For as long as videos have existed, we’ve trusted them as a reliable form of evidence.

Nothing is as impactful as seeing something happen on video (e.g. the Kennedy assassination) or seeing someone say something on video, especially if it’s recorded in an inconspicuous manner (e.g.

Mitt Romney’s damning “47 percent” video). However, that foundation of trust is slowly fading as a new generation of AI-doctored videos finds their way into the mainstream.

Famously known as “deepfakes,” the synthetic videos are created using an application called FakeApp, which uses artificial intelligence to swap the faces in a video with those of another person. Since making its first appearance earlier this month, FakeApp has gathered a large community and hundreds of thousands of downloads.

And a considerable number of its users were interested in using the application for questionable uses. Creating fake video is nothing new, but it previously required access to special hardware, experts and plenty of money. Read more from thenextweb.com…

thumbnail courtesy of thenextweb.com