Comment In the same way it has become de rigueur to slag off Facebook for its many privacy sins while billions still dump their data into the service, it’s also pretty trendy to pretend that blockchain, a digital ledger that records transactions publicly and permanently, offers answers to a new and improved decentralised web that leaves individuals, not Facebook, in charge of their data. It is complete and utter rubbish.

It’s not that a blockchain-based web isn’t possible. After all, the original web was decentralised, too, and came with the privacy guarantees that blockchain-based options today purport to deliver.

No, the problem is people. As user interface designer Brennan Novak details, though the blockchain may solve the crypto crowd’s privacy goals, it fails to offer something as secure and easy as a (yes) Facebook or Google login: “The problem exists somewhere between the barrier to entry (user-interface design, technical difficulty to set up, and overall user experience) versus the perceived value of the tool, as seen by Joe Public and Joe Amateur Techie.”

The early web was chaotic. Decentralised, yes, bu t chaotic.

Finding one’s way to new services was virtually impossible, leading to directory services (I distinctly remember buying a “yellow pages” index of all the known sites from a bookstore) and, eventually, to Google indexing the web for us so that we could use search to navigate around. At the same time, services like Compuserve arose to give average humans a way to use the web, and services thereon. Read more from theregister.co.uk…

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