With scaling the center of attention in the public blockchain sector, an older but lesser known attempt to overcome the restrictions inherent in ethereum is getting a refresh. Revealed in an exclusive interview with CoinDesk, a new TrueBit protocol is being released this December, one that removes the ethereum “gas limit,” which today puts an upper-bound on the number of computations the network can achieve, bringing the second largest blockchain by market capitalization closer to its oft-touted goal of becoming a “world computer.” While TrueBit is one of many in-progress scaling solutions being engineered for the ethereum platform – working alongside mechanisms such as sharding, state channels and Raiden – it distinguishes itself by focusing on the computational power of the network at large, instead of just transaction speed. Geared specifically towards heavy computations, such as those video broadcasting and machine learning would require, TrueBit could resolve the fact that ethereum is still about as fast as a “smartphone from 1999,” as ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin joked last year. “In short, the new scheme would be a vast simplification of the current TrueBit protocol,” said Zack Lawrence, the co-founder of 1protocol, who developed the technology. And these gains all came about after speculation that someone could exploit the protocol, after an amendment to its white paper was released last month. Jason Teutsch, a mathematician and co-founder of TrueBit, framed the speculation, and the process for patching the vulnerability, with a silver lining:

And going deeper led the devs to the incentive mechanism used in the protocol. TrueBit aims to remove the gas limit on ethereum by moving computations off-chain – outsourcing them to an external marketplace that rewards participants for solving and verifying the computations. Read more here…

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