Marketers are stuck in a Bermuda Triangle of being fearful that of innovations impacting their jobs, yet if they don’t use new tech they will fail to meet business outcomes. According to a new study by LinkedIn, Australian marketers are not future proofing themselves, are failing to leverage new technologies and are “are going to have to get up to speed”.

In the professional network’s 2018 Marketing Trends study, which surveyed nearly 800 people across APAC, 217 of which were from Australia, has found that Australian marketers are behind their APAC counterparts when it comes to leveraging new technologies. Stats show that Australian marketers feel unprepared for the impact of new technologies, with one in three saying their team is not well prepared, compared to just one in 10 marketers from across APAC expressing the same concern.

Only a third of Australian marketers see artificial intelligence, machine learning, augmented reality and virtual reality as opportunities. In contrast, nearly half of all APAC marketers see these same technologies as opportunities.

Customer acquisition and retention are the top priorities for Australian marketers this year. However, the survey found that Australian marketers are not investing in the innovative technologies, nor the skills, that are becoming increasingly critical to the development and delivery of seamless customer experiences.

“This reflects a distinct gap between desired business outcomes and investment to achieve these outcomes,” LinkedIn’s new director of marketing solutions Prue Cox says. Cox, who joined LinkedIn in October from a commercial director role at Pacific Magazines, says the continued lag in adoption of innovative technologies will result in Australian marketers failing to meet business objectives.  While she believes it is essential that Australian marketing teams start investing in these technologies and the skills required to leverage them, the survey says Australian marketers see new technologies as a threat, rather than an opportunity. Read more from adnews.com.au…

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