Weak or nonexistent property rights lead to low economic productivity. Citizens of countries that do not protect property rights must necessarily spend much energy, thought, and time in an anxious effort to secure what little production they can manage.

Many innovations and business models are unfeasible without property rights because they will be destroyed (or, more often, deterred) by one or another form of theft. Even a marginal improvement in access to property rights should drive the economic equilibria of many countries in the direction of wealth creation. Because it is decentralized, significantly easier to transport, store, or hide, and—this is crucial to augmenting property rights—significantly more difficult to seize than any traditional asset, Bitcoin delivers a real improvement in property rights at a comparatively modest cost (risk due to price volatility + transaction fees).

Beyond black market applications, Bitcoin has utility and value because most of the world’s population lives in countries that do not uphold property rights. *It is important not to underestimate this.

Uncertainty discourages people from working hard and taking risks. First world countries owe a significant part of their productivity and wealth to the rule of law and property rights.

Any shift in that direction should also increase the amount of economic activity in a country that is normally a dangerous place to be successful. **Having done business in China and India, I speak from personal experience when I say that nearly every businessperson and any typical middle-class citizen in these countries is guilty of regularly, or at least occasionally, breaking tax laws, bribery, and so forth, to get by. Read more from fee.org…

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