Baked by Melissa co-founder Melissa Ben-ishay on building a cupcake brand, being the boss, working with family, and getting fired report on May 18 discussing the volatility of the bitcoin price and its impact on the ways bitcoin should be classified, whether as a currency, security, or commodity.” data-reactid=”31″>The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco released a report on May 18 discussing the volatility of the bitcoin price and its impact on the ways bitcoin should be classified, whether as a currency, security, or commodity.

Joost van der Burgt, author of the publication and fintech policy advisor at the Federal Reserve’s San Francisco branch, confirms what many have already said: that bitcoin straddles the properties of all three asset classes. However, he draws interesting points over properties that make bitcoin fit into one category better over others.

Burgt also shows historical evidence that suggests bitcoin is in a bubble, without saying firmly whether it is or not. Though the price volatility would be an obvious reason why bitcoin struggles as a real-world currency, Burgt looks more closely at the ways it is currently used in the market place alongside central banking structures.

regulations, he says that bitcoin lacks a corresponding real value, which is a key part in exchange for goods.” data-reactid=”47″>His conclusion comes as no surprise: bitcoin is not traded for goods much at all.

In additional to increasingly unfavorable global regulations, he says that bitcoin lacks a corresponding real value, which is a key part in exchange for goods. “…the exchange rate between two currencies can be regarded as a broad measure of the prices of one country’s goods and services relative to another country. Read more from finance.yahoo.com…

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