If companies in developed economies want to continue to grow, they’ll have to face an uncomfortable fact: the talent pool they’ve traditionally relied on will be shrinking for generations to come.That’s because economically developed countries are experiencing historically low birth rates. And as wealthy nations grow richer, fewer citizens are deciding to have children.

Leading reasons for this decline include increased costs of living, more social and business opportunities for women, and better health care which affords people the opportunity to live longer.   That trend is reversed in poorer nations where birth rates remain high and greater opportunity may lie elsewhere.

Add to this the relative ease of modern transportation and communication, and the global population, i.e. the global workforce, is growing more diverse.

The international migrant population globally has increased in size but remained relatively stable as a proportion of the world’s population. (UN World Migration Report 2018) Migration patterns predominantly reflect economic realities.

Countries that offer economic opportunity receive net migration inflows, while countries that do not will steadily lose a portion of their population. In 2015, the Congo ranked as the world’s poorest nation and its population was composed of 545,000 immigrants; meanwhile, 1.3 million native Congolese had left the country. Read more from bigthink.com…

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