Years have gone by since any new piece of writing has appeared by Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous creator of bitcoin. But on Friday night, someone claiming to be Nakomoto published 21 pages of new material—a sneak preview, allegedly, of a book about the cryptocurrency’s origins.

The excerpt appeared at 11:45 p.m., on a website, NakamotoFamilyFoundation.org, purchased three days ago via Amazon’s domain registrar. The self-proclaimed Nakamoto also made contact with WIRED.

Ever since bitcoin’s anonymous creation, numerous people have come forward claiming to be Nakamoto; online conspiracy theories and journalistic investigations have fingered one Satoshi after another. A widely debunked 2014 Newsweek magazine article pointed to a Japanese-American man in California; in 2015, WIRED reported that Australian academic Craig Wright “was either the inventor of Bitcoin … or a hoaxer.” Wright continues to push that he’s Nakamoto, even tweeting Friday in a cryptic message that he would soon prove it and, over the weekend, tweeting without elaboration that the “new” Nakamoto writings were a fraud: “Nakamotofamilyfoundation cannot get the dates nor technical details correct.” Numerous people have come forward claiming to be Nakamoto;
online conspiracy theories and journalistic investigations have
fingered one Satoshi after another.

In all that time, no one has proven themselves to be Nakamoto to the satisfaction of the members of the cryptographic community that helped give birth to bitcoin. As skeptics in the cryptography community have repeatedly pointed out, the true Satoshi ought to have access to the cryptographic keys that control the first bitcoins—coins that have stayed put for a decade.

If someone purporting to be Nakamoto were to move one of those coins to a different address or sign something with keys that only Satoshi has, that would be a pretty good form of verification. This new Nakamoto—who still does not want his real identity revealed—declined to move any coins or sign anything with his own keys. Read more from wired.com…

thumbnail courtesy of wired.com