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The problem is that this function doesn’t actually generate true random data, as an anonymous user recently pointed out on the Linux Foundation mailing list, along with David Gerard, a UK-based Unix system administrator. “It will generate cryptographic keys that, despite their length, have less than 48 bits of entropy, [ Read more from bleepingcomputer.com…

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