The pair, who attended Harvard with Mr Zuckerberg, won a $65 million payout from Facebook in 2008, claiming he had stolen their idea. In March 2013, they used $11 million of the settlement to buy roughly 1 per cent of the world’s supply of bitcoin in March 2013, when one coin was worth around $120.The hoard has not been disclosed but is estimated to be around 100,000 bitcoins – worth more than $1 billion at the cryptocurrency’s peak last week.Since their clash with Facebook, the twins – who rowed for the US at the Beijing Olympics – have restyled themselves as Bitcoin entrepreneurs, launching their own online exchange and venture capital fund. The pair are believed to have held onto their bitcoin investments in the hope of launching an exchange-traded fund in New York, although they have struggled to gain approval from financial regulators.”We’ve never sold a bitcoin, we’re in it for the long haul,” Cameron Winklevoss said two years ago. Tyler Winklevoss, who has said the currency could be worth trillions, told London’s The Daily Telegraph last year that Bitcoin was “like a better version of gold”. A spokesman for the twins did not respond to requests for comment.Cameron Winklevoss, left, and his twin Tyler leave a federal appeals court in San Francisco, California, US, in Janyary 2011. Facebook’s settlement of claims that its founder Mark Zuckerberg stole the idea for what became the world’s largest social-networking website should be undone, the former college classmates of Mr Zuckerberg told an appeals court. Photo: Noah Berger.Only a handful of bitcoin wallets have holdings worth more than $1 billion, including the cryptocurrency’s mysterious inventor, who has never been unmasked and is known only by the online pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. The Winklevoss twins are the most high profile of its big backers.Bitcoin, which is not backed by any central bank but maintained by a network of its users, hit an all-time high last week despite Lloyd Blankfein, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs, joining other financial heavyweights in dismissing it as a fraud. Read more here…

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