The Daily Roundup is our comprehensive coverage of the VR industry wrapped up into one daily email, delivered directly to your inbox.  The Daily Roundup is our comprehensive coverage of the VR industry wrapped up into one daily email, delivered directly to your inbox. Oculus Go, the company’s $200 standalone VR headset, launched at Facebook’s F8 developer conference yesterday to much fanfare—likely because everyone in attendance got one free.

Now that anyone can get their hands on one, Oculus founder and ex-employee Palmer Luckey took it upon himself to post a single image of the headset laid bare, revealing a few interesting bits including what might be a replaceable battery. Usually sites like iFixit are the first out the gate to post teardown images—admittedly their job is tad time-intensive though considering they also have to rate it on repairablity, and document every step of the way—but Luckey’s first image does reveal some information we didn’t already know.

According to a recent tweet by Luckey detailing his teardown of Go, the headset contains a standard 2600mAh cell (bottom right), which he concludes “[s]hould be an easy upgrade.” The battery appears to be a single 18650, which is a cell type is used in many laptop computer batteries. If Luckey didn’t damage the headset beyond repair during his teardown, it could be possible to swap the battery for a higher-capacity cell in the 18650 size format, therefore lengthening the unit’s battery life and most likely also voiding the warranty in the process.

Oculus Go is rated for a 2 to 2.5 hour battery life for normal use, so this might be a nifty upgrade—barring any problems with the headset’s ability to remain cool during use, that is. On the faceplate itself, the picture reveals copper heat sink designed to better distribute heat from the Go’s Snapdragon 821 processor, the same that drives the first-gen Google Pixel smartphone.

Because Go has a greater surface area for passive cooling, the processor has been overclocked to allow for a max 72Hz refresh—something Gear VR can’t do. Another interesting bit from Luckey’s teardown image is the integrated speakers, which cleverly hides in the hinge of the headset’s side straps. Read more from roadtovr.com…

thumbnail courtesy of roadtovr.com